It’s OK to Talk is an adolescent and youth-focused programme started in 2016, which aims to increase awareness about mental health and wellbeing, so that more young people feel able to engage in dialogue on mental health, and seek help. The It's Ok to Talk programme comprised three core activities: It's Ok to Talk website, events and workshops, and a social media campaign.

14th May 2018 • comment

Standing Voice is an organisation that works to support people with albinism in Tanzania. This article explores how one of their projects, which communicates facts about albinism through interactive performances, navigates the cultural complexity surrounding albinism in Tanzania.

30th April 2018 • comment

This report is a synthesis of discussions held at the Wellcome Trust International Engagement Workshop: 'Telling Stories'. Points raised touched upon the practical and theoretical challenges involved in translating science to diverse audiences, using creative methodologies in public engagement, and working with diverse and vulnerable groups. This report is a synthesis of the discussions, key points and key questions raised at the workshop.

27th March 2018 • comment

This paper describes a case study, which planned to involve citizen science in an air pollution study. Findings are based on interviews and observations, including a six-month field diary, of ten scientists who engaged in a citizen science project not because they are convinced of its value as an approach to strong science but in order to receive funding for their scientific research. 

22nd March 2018 • comment

This working paper  explores the opportunities and challenges associated with visual research methodologies. The paper draws specifically on a MoVE (methods: visual: explore) project that explored the lived experiences of migrant groups in southern Africa.  

23rd February 2018 • comment

This Podcast was recorded by the Mesh Team, based on an interview with Dr Heidi Larson from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. In this 30-minute interview, Dr Larson provides her insight into the public health community and the pitfalls researchers and engagement practitioners can find themselves in when working with communities to roll out vaccines. 

22nd February 2018 • comment

This short podcast examines the influence of social memory on vaccine hesitancy and explores ways to address some of the issues that arise when researchers engage communities who are hesitant towards vaccines.

22nd February 2018 • comment

This Podcast explores the power of trust between communities who are hesitant towards vaccines, and the public health community who are delivering immunisation. Dr Heidi Larson gives an in-depth analysis of the pitfalls and challenges in tackling this issue.

22nd February 2018 • comment

This short podcast examines the role provided by engagement practitioners in preparing for and responding to epidemic outbreak.

22nd February 2018 • comment

This report is based on conversations that took place at the Wellcome Trust’s fifth international engagement workshop ‘Trust Me I Am a Scientist’. The workshop took place in the UK in November 2013.

12th February 2018 • comment

This helpful presentation is the result of a workshop held in Durban by The Global Health Bioethics Network (course facilitators: Maureen Kelley, Patricia Kingori, Dorcas Kamuya, Mike Parker).

7th December 2017 • comment
5th July 2017 • comment
5th July 2017 • comment
22nd June 2017 • comment

Project Report: Method in Motion

by Brian Mackenwells, Mesh Editorial Team
9th June 2017 • comment

Project Report: The Lucky Specials

by Mesh Editorial Team
9th June 2017 • comment

Guide: Hands-on Activity on Density

by Mesh Editorial Team, Alex Adadevoh

Alexander Adadevoh from Lab 13 Ghana demonstrates how creative hands-on activities can be used to stimulate investigation, curiosity, discussion and learning in science.

15th May 2017 • comment
15th May 2017 • comment

Guide: Hands-on at the Francis Crick Institute

by Mesh Editorial Team, Jenny Jopson
15th May 2017 • comment

Guide: Cards Against Malaria - A Hands-on Activity

by Mesh Editorial Team, Brian Mackenwells

This article describes and provides the tools to use a card game developed to engage players with the genetics behind malaria susceptibility.

15th May 2017 • comment

This article introduces an activity designed to introduce people to key concepts in genomics.

15th May 2017 • comment

Mwangi Chege, participant of the 2017 Wellcome Trust workshop "It’s Complicated: navigating scientific complexity in public and community engagement" reflects on learning from the workshop. In particular, the Kenyan premiere of The Lucky Specials, a feature film designed as both entertainment and engagement with audiences about Multi-Drug Resistant Tuberculosis and the importance of drug adherence.

10th May 2017 • comment

A participant of the Mesh evaluating engagement workshop (March 2017) gives there reflection on the workshop and the key learning that came from it.

30th March 2017 • comment

A participant of the Mesh evaluating engagement workshop (March 2017) reflects on the learning from the workshop, focusing on points useful for health policy and systems researchers with an interest in gender and ethics.

27th March 2017 • comment

A participant reflection on the Mesh Evaluating Community Engagement Workshop (March 2017) which aimed to move forward the debates surrounding evaluation by drawing on practical experiences. 

23rd March 2017 • comment

Fishy Clouds, a puppet theatre show, was created to engage the community on issues of antimicrobial resistance and research with children in Thailand. Fishy Clouds ran for twelve shows during the months of November and December 2016 in schools, hospitals, theatres and health centres. The show was performed in Bangkok and in the greater Mae Sot area in the Tak district of Thailand.

9th February 2017 • comment

Project Report: Samala Moyo

by Malawi–Liverpool– Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme

Samala Moyo is an interactive exhibition with an outreach component designed to open the Malawi–Liverpool– Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme (MLW) to the local community and creatively explore crucial topics in medical research. The project was developed from a small International Engagement Award-funded pilot project and subsequently received £188,000.

15th December 2016 • comment

This brief report provides you with an overview of PRIDE’s activities at the Durga Puja Festival in New Delhi, India, to raise awareness among young people about mental health.

28th November 2016 • comment

Blood Sugars aims to improve understanding of patient and clinician experiences of types 1 and 2 diabetes – particularly in the context of urban South Africa; as well as to improve communication between patients, clinicians and researchers, helping to create a more detailed picture of the condition and how it might be managed more effectively.

7th November 2016 • comment

Village Drama against Malaria used Cambodian drama, art, music workshops and village concerts to mobilise rural communities to eliminate malaria. This report reflects upon the operations, successes and challanges of the project,

17th October 2016 • comment

Art is a powerful medium for communication and engagement with science. To create a collaborative project that melds art with research creative practitioners and scientists must be brought together, but these individuals may think differently, have different priorities and work in different ways. This account of Genome Adventures, gives a little insight into the process of bringing different disciplines together and the challanges and benefits that result. 

16th September 2016 • comment

In 2013, Art in Global Health set up artist residencies in six Wellcome Trust-funded research centres as a way of teasing out some of the more personal, philosophical, cultural and political dimensions of health research. This exciting project was born out of Wellcome Collection's desire to engage the curious public globally with the health research that the Trust funds - in Kenya, Malawi, South Africa, Thailand, Vietnam and the UK. 

26th August 2016 • comment

A blog post addressing the issue of mental illness amongst people living with HIV and the presentation of the community engagement project Project Khuluma which will be presented at the 21st annual International AIDS conference.

21st July 2016 • comment

An introduction to the work of the Angkor Hospital for Children’s (AHC) Young Persons Advisory Group, a group of young Cambodians (aged 10 – 15 years) who meet monthly to discuss important operational and research issues arising from the AHC management. 

15th July 2016 • comment

A summary and evaluation of the Khuluma project which provides psychosocial support for HIV positive adolescents in South Africa using mobile technology.

16th June 2016 • comment

Migration, health and wellbeing in Southern Africa: Co-produced exhibition captures experiences of LGBTIQ migrants and asylum seekers in Johannesburg and migrant men, women and transgender persons who sell sex in South Africa

9th May 2016 • comment

A case study of The Vaidya’s Oath project which engaged audiences and school children with antimicrobial resistance.

26th April 2016 • comment

Case study of a project run by the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine which enabled adolescents in Zimbabwe to capture their stories and the stories of others living with HIV.

11th April 2016 • comment

Information about Citizen Science Reporters (CSR), a group in Southeast Asia that runs workshops to teach community members how to film and edit video documentaries using a smart phone. The videos are then used to explore health issues faced by the community.

11th April 2016 • comment

A Case Study: In 2012 the Oxford University Clinical Research Unit (OUCRU) was awarded £29,999 from the Wellcome Trust International Engagement Awards over three years to implement an engagement project alongside its Vietnam Initiative on Zoonotic Infections (VIZIONS). The project uses simple digital storytelling techniques to bring to the surface the participants’ ideas about personal and public risk and perceptions of disease and transmission.

7th March 2016 • comment

In 2012 the Wellcome Trust International Engagement Awards supported a project based in the informal settlement of Dharavi in Mumbai, India, one of the largest ‘slums’ in the world. The project gives the local community an opportunity to engage with relevant health issues through a series of art projects, culminating in a large art and health festival in February and March 2015 — the Dharavi Biennale. This work grew out of a successful small award and received £130,000 over three years.

7th January 2016 • comment